Friday, February 13, 2015

#6 Dating Violence

Part 6 of our social media series on Teen Dating, Healthy Relationships and Consent is about recognizing unhealthy behavior. First, understand that all relationships should be equal and that no partner should have more “say” than the other. While someone who wants to spend all of their time with you or who texts you 100 times a day can seem endearing, it may also be a warning sign for control. Sometimes that leads to the use of fear, intimidation or physical and sexual violence. Remember, the best way to create a healthy, respectful and equal relationship is by holding you and your partner accountable to standards that you create together. Please watch our video: Dating Violence.

The goal of this six-part campaign is to encourage teens to make informed decisions about relationships, and encourage adults to open the lines of communication with young adults. For additional resources please visit www.loveisrespect.org, www.sparcc.net or www.itsonus.org

#5 What is Sexting

Part 5 of our social media series on Teen Dating, Healthy Relationships and Consent is focused on sexting, or sending photos or images of nudity or sexual situations. With the rapid pace of today’s technology, a text or photo message can be replicated and accessible to millions of people in a matter of seconds. This is something you have to consider before hitting that ‘send’ button. Ask yourself: what if you and your partner break up? What if your phone is lost or stolen? Do you want those images shared with the rest of the world? Before you make the decision to share an intimate photo, think twice and then think a third time. Please watch our video: What is Sexting?

The goal of this six-part campaign is to encourage teens to make informed decisions about relationships, and encourage adults to open the lines of communication with young adults. For additional resources please visit www.loveisrespect.org, www.sparcc.net or www.itsonus.org.

Thursday, February 12, 2015

#4 Law

Part 4 of our social media series on Teen Dating, Healthy Relationships and Consent is focused on the law. The legal age for consent is 16 and up, but there are other components to make that consent valid. In addition, the law addresses how old the partner can be. And in regard to the law and consent, that yes has to be “knowing, voluntary and intelligent.” If not, the other person might be in legal trouble. Why are we telling you this? Because in some of the cases we see, the violator (who could be charged with a crime) didn’t know what they did was wrong. Please watch our video: What is the Law.

The goal of this six-part campaign is to encourage teens to make informed decisions about relationships, and encourage adults to open the lines of communication with young adults. For additional resources please visit www.loveisrespect.org, www.sparcc.net or www.itsonus.org.

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

#3 Consent

Part 3 of our social media series on Teen Dating, Healthy Relationships and Consent is focused on that last term – consent. By definition it means “permission for something to happen or agreement to do something.”  In sexual situations, consent is critical. You’ve probably heard the phrase “yes means yes and no means no.” If you feel like you can’t say ‘”no,” then you’re not in a relationship with someone who respects your answer. Silence, hesitation or maybes don’t count – they all mean no. And anyone who is impaired or taking a substance that could impair their judgment cannot give consent. Please watch our video: What is Consent.

The goal of this six-part campaign is to encourage teens to make informed decisions about relationships, and encourage adults to open the lines of communication with young adults. For additional resources please visit www.loveisrespect.org, www.sparcc.net or www.itsonus.org

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

#2 Respect

Part 2 of our social media series on Teen Dating, Healthy Relationships and Consent is all about respect. Respect is a key ingredient in any relationship – not just romantic ones – and this includes both respect for yourself and for the other person. If you are confident about who you are as a person, you will be more apt to set healthy boundaries for conduct that you will and won’t accept from someone else, or in sexual situations, what you will and won’t do. If you don’t respect yourself in a way that you can voice it to another person, how can you expect them to respect you, your opinions or your wishes? That’s when their voice can easily overtake yours.  Please watch our video: What is Respect.

The goal of this six-part campaign is to encourage teens to make informed decisions about relationships, and encourage adults to open the lines of communication with young adults. For additional resources please visit www.loveisrespect.org, www.sparcc.net or www.itsonus.org.


Monday, February 9, 2015

#1 Starting the Conversation

Part 1 of our social media series on Teen Dating, Healthy Relationships and Consent begins at the core of the issue – communication. It is important for teens to become educated about what it means to be in a healthy relationship with healthy boundaries. Part of this involves having conversations with a parent or trusted adult before making big decisions that could have a lasting impact. Someone who isn’t willing or able to discuss these situations might not be ready to make those decisions just yet. This includes understanding consent, setting and expressing expectations within relationships and most importantly, being comfortable with yourself. Please watch our video: Starting the Conversation.

The goal of this six-part campaign is to encourage teens to make informed decisions about relationships, and encourage adults to open the lines of communication with young adults. For additional resources please visit www.loveisrespect.org

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Protecting Yourself during Tax Season

It’s that time of year again and identify theft is a major concern for taxpayers. Recognized by the Federal Trade Commission as Tax Identify Theft Awareness Week, we figured it was a great opportunity to hit on IRS scams. In recent attempts, scammers start by stealing your social security number then fraudulently file a tax return in your name. They request a large refund payout from the IRS, run off with your hard-earned cash and leave you to clean up the mess. Often times, victims don’t learn about the scam until they find out that more than one tax return has been filed in their name or they see submitted wages from an unknown employer. 

So what can you do as a taxpayer to protect yourself from being victimized? Most importantly, keep your social security number protected and understand that the IRS will never contact you by email, text or social media message to request your personal information. Second, don’t wait until the last minute to file your tax return. Thieves won’t be able to steal your refund if you’ve already filed it yourself! Finally, keep an eye out for letters from the IRS during tax season. If someone steals your identity and files a duplicate tax return, the agency will send you a letter to report the problem.

If you think you may be a victim of tax identity theft, contact the IRS immediately to report the fraud. The IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit can be called directly at 1-800-908-4490. You can also file a complaint with the FTC by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP or visiting their website.